Turkey and Ricotta Meatballs

Tuesday, January 31, 2017




Remember that chocolate cake from Julia Turshen I've been raving about? These Turkey and Ricotta Meatballs are another recipe from her book, Small Victories.  I've made them several times, and they are simply delightful. While the sauce she features in the book is great, I have chosen to use my favorite sauce recipe by Marcella Hazan, which is groan-worthy in it's own right, and so easy.


I intended to write up a longer blog post for these beauties, along with homage to my friend, Amanda, who introduced me to cooking Italian-inspired food. However, several nights ago I nearly sliced off the tip of my finger in a knife accident, so typing is happening via the pecking method today, which is slow and painful. At any rate, I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as our family does!




Turkey and Ricotta Meatballs 


Turkey and Ricotta Meatballs 
(Serves 6)

Sauce

2 - 28-oz. cans San Marzano Whole Peeled Tomatoes
2 yellow onions, peeled and cut in half
2 sticks unsalted butter
Salt to taste

Meatballs

2 pounds ground turkey
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 1/2 cups whole milk Ricotta cheese
1 cup chopped Italian parsley
1 cup chopped fresh basil
3 garlic cloves, minced
A pinch of salt

Process

Sauce
Pour the tomatoes into a large pot, squishing them with your hands. (I usually add about a cup of water, from rinsing out the tomato cans.) Add the onions, cut side down, and the butter. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour. Stir occasionally. When the onions fall apart and are soft, you'll know the sauce is done. Season with salt, to taste.

Meatballs
While the sauce is bubbling, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil and brush olive oil over the foil. Set pan aside

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients for the meatballs. Blend everything gently with your hands. Form into golf-ball sized meatballs and place them on the baking sheet. Spray with olive oil cooking spray or brush with olive oil.

Bake them for about 25 - 30 minutes, then remove from the oven and transfer them into the pot of bubbling sauce. Let them simmer in the sauce for about 10 - 15 minutes.

Serve over 16 ounces of cooked pasta. (I prefer thin spaghetti noodles.)

1 comment:

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